Fashion Trend: Large Buttons

The September issue of W Magazine has a short blurb on recent interest of buttons in fashion as evidenced by their prominence in a number of recent collections and an early 2015 exhibition at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris on the history of the use of buttons in fashion from pure function to pure decoration.  A NYT blog post has a great listing of the use of buttons by various designers,

…. In the 1950s, buttons emphasized the cut of the female silhouette, as exemplified by a Christian Dior red wool dress with a fetching double column of black buttons down the back. Courrèges used buttons graphically; Yves Saint Laurent used them as embellishment; and Mademoiselle Chanel had a firmly pragmatic design strategy: “No buttons without buttonholes.”                                                                                 

As those who have follow our blog posts, our fashion muse is the postmodern architect Robert Venturi.  His “decorated shed” aesthetic used decorations as efficient signs.

We have several pieces that references the great 60s designer Courreges who often used double rows of large buttons, sometimes functional, sometime not.

We use  2″ buttons, no less, as signs of Courreges.

Post-Mod - reference to Courreges

Post-Mod – reference to Courreges

 


Reference to Mod 60s Fashion: 2 inch buttons

Reference to Mod 60s Fashion: 2 inch buttons

 

Reference to Mod 60s Fashion: 2 inch buttons

Reference to Mod 60s Fashion: 2 inch buttons


Signs of Courreges

We saw today that Estee Lauder partnered with the fashion house Courreges to create a new line of fragrances and skin products. Kendall Jenner is the line’s model.

Below are two of our Post-Mod® racerbacks that reference the great 60s mod designer Courreges.

Kendall Jenner now model for Estee Lauder and Courreges

Kendall Jenner now model for Estee Lauder and Courreges

Beaks of Eagles Mod Racerback Reference to Courreges

Beaks of Eagles Mod Racerback Reference to Courreges


Where Our Post-Mod Racerback Fits into the History of Pockets

There was an interesting line from an in-depth New Yorker piece on Apple’s chief designer, Jony Ive, where he referenced the evolution of pocket design,

“When Ive, in discussing this work with me, referred to such topics as the evolution of sewn pockets, it was easy to detect his pleasure in being answerable to history”

Our use pockets as “signs” applied as decorations to black racerback “shed” is based on post-modern design theories of Robert Venturi.  This is just an evolutions of pockets in the 17th and 18th century as internal, secure purses to pocket as external storage in the 19th and mid-20th century to absen e of pockets on women’s garments lately.

17th Century Pockets as internal. secure purses

17th Century Pockets as internal. secure purses

 Here is a picture of a Courreges dress from the Mod 60s which feature prominently external pockets.   The pockets are intended to be decorative and stand out.  But they are part of the overall design rather seen separately as a sign.

Courreges Dress from the Mod 60s

Courreges Dress from the Mod 60s

Here are a couple of pictures of our Post-Mod and Modpunk racerbacks with pocket as signs after Venturi.

Post-Mod ® Racerback by Beaks of Eagles

Post-Mod ® Racerback by Beaks of Eagles